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Welcome New Faculty!

New Clinicians and Basic Scientists Join Columbia Neurology

Meet Dr. Bradshaw

Elizabeth M. Bradshaw, PhD is an assistant professor of neurological sciences (in Neurology, the Taub Institute, the Precision Medicine Initiative, and the Center for Translational and Computational Neuro-immunology).  Dr. Bradshaw received her PhD in Biochemistry from Tufts University, with a thesis exploring the DNA-binding domain of SV40.  She subsequently left the field of structural biology to follow an emerging interest in immunology, joining the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School as a research fellow in clinical immunology, and later joining the faculty.  A main focus of Dr. Bradshaw’s work has been understanding the role of the human innate immune system in complex neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD).  Interestingly, genetic studies of AD directly implicate the involvement of the innate immune system.  In PD, the genetic modulation of the immune system is still being uncovered.  Currently, as co-director of basic research in the new Center for Translational and Computational Neuro-immunology, led by new Division of Neuro-immunology Chief Dr. Philip De Jager, one of Dr. Bradshaw’s major research interests is the translation of findings from these studies to molecular outcomes and potentially therapeutically targetable molecules in innate immune cells.


Meet Dr. de Nooij

Joriene de Nooij, PhD is an assistant professor of neurological sciences (in Neurology, the Columbia Translational Neuroscience Initiative [CTNI], and the Thompson Family Foundation Initiative [TFFI] on Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy [CIPN]).  Dr. de Nooij obtained her PhD in Developmental Genetics from Utrecht University (The Netherlands), working with Dr. I.K. Hariharan at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School.  She performed her post-doctoral work here at Columbia with Dr. Tom Jessell, as a fellow of the Helen Hay Whitney Foundation, and continued as an associate research scientist, prior to being recruited as a faculty member.  Extending the work she performed in the Jessell laboratory, Dr. de Nooij’s research is aimed at understanding the molecular and cellular basis of the proprioceptive sense, and how individual proprioceptor subtypes shape motor-output.  Dr. de Nooij has recently begun to leverage her expertise in sensory neuron biology to develop protocols for the in vitro derivation of somatic sensory neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), with the goal to model sensory neuropathies, including CIPN and Friedreich’s ataxia, using sensory neurons obtained from patient-derived iPSCs.


Meet Dr. Elyaman 

Wassim Elyaman, PhD is an assistant professor of neurological sciences (in Neurology, the Taub Institute, the Precision Medicine Initiative, and the Center for Translational and Computational Neuro-immunology).  Dr. Elyaman received his PhD from the University of Limoges (France), where he studied mechanisms of neuronal cell death in Alzheimer’s disease. As a postdoctoral fellow and, subsequently, as faculty at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, he developed mouse models of autoimmune encephalomyelitis to study the role of T cell lymphocytes in Multiple Sclerosis (MS).  Currently, the main line of inquiry in Dr. Elyaman’s laboratory is to understand how regions of the human genome containing risk alleles alter the function of T cells and, in doing so, increases an individual’s risk of developing autoimmune and/or neurodegenerative diseases.  As the co-director for basic research in the new Center for Translational and Computational Neuro-immunology (CTCN), his goal is to translate research findings into novel clinical tools to enhance drug discovery efforts using human and murine systems.  Dr. Elyaman was recently awarded an R01 to characterize novel targets associated with genetic variants expressed in the adaptive immune system that lead to MS.  In collaboration with CTCN Director Dr. Philip De Jager, the study leverages blood samples from patients with MS and from the PhenoGenetic Project (PGP), a biobank of healthy genotyped subjects, to unravel the complexity of genetic variation without the confounder of disease, in addition to genetic mouse models of MS.


Meet Dr. Gelinas

Pediatric Epilepsy Specialist
Jennifer Gelinas, MD, PhD is an assistant professor of neurology (in the Institute for Genomic Medicine and the Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center) in the Division of Child Neurology.  Dr. Gelinas obtained her MD and PhD at the University of Alberta, Canada.  She completed pediatric neurology residency at the University of British Columbia, followed by an epilepsy fellowship and a postdoctoral research fellowship at NYU Langone Medical Center.  In her clinical practice, Dr. Gelinas focuses on infantile and childhood epilepsy, with a special interest in epilepsy surgery and intracranial electroencephalography.  In research, Dr. Gelinas is focused on understanding how epileptic activity disrupts the proper development and function of neural networks.  The overall goal of her research is to identify novel biomarkers and systems level treatments for epileptic disorders, especially those affecting neonates and children.  Dr. Gelinas will be seeing patients at the new ColumbiaDoctors Neurology West 86th Street location.

For an appointment with Dr. Gelinas, please call 646-42-NEURO (646-426-3876).


Meet Dr. Katus

Multispecialty Neurology and Child Neurology Specialist
Linn E. Katus, DO, MSc is an assistant professor of neurology in the Divisions of Multispecialty Neurology and Child Neurology.  Dr. Katus obtained her medical degree from New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, followed by medical internship at the University of Cincinnati.  She subsequently completed neurology residency at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, followed by fellowship in movement disorders at Mount Sinai Hospital.  In addition to seeing adult neurological and movement disorder patients, Dr. Katus has a special interest in childhood movement disorders and will be seeing a limited number of pediatric patients, as well.

For an appointment with Dr. Katus, please call 646-42-NEURO (646-426-3876).
 

Meet Dr. Lee

Child Neurology and Neuro-immunology Specialist
Ji Lee, MD, PhD is an assistant professor of neurology in the Divisions of Child Neurology and Neuro-immunology.  After graduating from Columbia University with a dual degree in French Comparative Literature and Neuroscience and Behavior, Dr. Lee received her MD-PhD from Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  Dr. Lee performed her immunology PhD research in Dr. Betty Diamond’s lab (then at CUMC Rheumatology), where she characterized the consequences of in utero exposure to maternal neurotoxic anti-N-Methyl D-Aspartate R (NMDAR) autoantibodies on the offspring’s brain development and its subsequent manifestation in adult cognition and behavior using a systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) murine model.  Dr. Lee completed her pediatric neurology residency training at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  She went on to complete a pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) and related disorders fellowship at MGH.  During her fellowship, Dr. Lee joined Dr. Philip De Jager’s lab to pursue human neuro-immunology research and to combine her clinical and research interests in pediatric MS.  Her current research is focused on determining immune cell-specific epigenomic changes in pediatric MS, to gain a detailed understanding of the mechanisms underlying early gene-environment interaction. The ultimate goal is to develop novel strategies for modulating neuro-immunologic mechanisms that can be used to treat children with MS.  Under the direction of Dr. De Jager, Dr. Lee will lead the Pediatric Genes and Environment in MS Project.  In addition to pediatric and young adult MS patient care, Dr. Lee has a broad interest in autoimmune neurology.

For an appointment with Dr. Lee, please call 646-42-NEURO (646-426-3876).


Meet Dr. Miller

Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease Specialist
Eliza Miller, MD is an assistant professor of neurology in the Division of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease.  Dr. Miller completed her doctoral degree, internship, and residency training in Neurology here at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center (NYP/CUMC), as well as fellowship training in Vascular Neurology, under the mentorship of Dr. Randy Marshall.  In both her clinical and research activities, Dr. Miller has a particular interest in women’s cerebrovascular health through all life stages and is an expert in cerebrovascular complications of pregnancy and the postpartum period. In addition to her outpatient stroke and cerebrovascular disease practice, Dr. Miller sees patients in collaboration with the Columbia Mothers Center, a multidisciplinary comprehensive center for the management of high risk pregnancies.  In collaboration with the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, she conducts clinical research exploring the epidemiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy-related stroke.

For an appointment with Dr. Miller, please call 212-305-1710.


Meet Dr. Sands

Pediatric Epilepsy Specialist
Tristan Sands, MD, PhD is an assistant professor of neurology in the Division of Child Neurology and the Institute for Genomic Medicine (IGM).  Dr. Sands is a graduate of the Medical Scientist Training Program at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. He completed his child neurology residency at the University of California San Francisco and returned to NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center for fellowship in Clinical Neurophysiology/EEG-Epilepsy.  Dr. Sands has clinical and research expertise in seizures, epilepsies, and epileptic encephalopathies resulting from genetic causes.  In addition to seeing pediatric epilepsy patients at the new ColumbiaDoctors Neurology West 86th Street location and the Harkness Pavilion, Dr. Sands will also be evaluating genetic epilepsy patients in a new Translational Medicine Clinic for the Genetic Epilepsies, as well as conducting research on precision medicine for the genetic epilepsies with the Institute for Genomic Medicine at Columbia.

For an appointment with Dr. Sands, please call 646-42-NEURO (646-426-3876).


Meet Dr. Silver

Child Neurology Specialist
Wendy Silver, MD, MA is an assistant professor of neurology at CUMC, in the Division of Child Neurology. Dr. Silver completed her internship and residency in pediatrics at New York Medical College and the Maria Fareri Children's Hospital at Westchester Medical Center.  She continued fellowship training in child neurology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, where she also completed a Leadership in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (LEND) research fellowship. Dr. Silver then served as an instructor of neurology and pediatrics as well as an attending pediatric neurologist at Montefiore Medical Center for several years before becoming an assistant professor of neurology and pediatrics at New York Medical College while practicing medicine with Boston Children's Health Physicians and serving as an attending pediatric neurologist at the Maria Fareri Children's hospital. Dr. Silver's clinical and research interests include autistic spectrum disorder, ADHD, traumatic brain injury, and behavioral neurology. She is currently co-principal investigator on a research project titled, "Optical Measurement of Cerebral Hemodynamics in Pediatric Subjects with Post-Traumatic Headache: A Pilot Study."  This study aims to use a new, near-infrared device that measures cerebral blood flow to look at subjects' age 15-19 years of age with prolonged post-concussion headache.  Dr. Silver will be seeing pediatric neurology patients at the new West 86th Street location.

For an appointment with Dr. Silver, please call 646-42-NEURO (646-426-3876).